Don’t cry for me Argentina

So I’ve enjoyed Open House this weekend. For those not familiar – ‘open house’ weekend occurs one weekend a year during which many of London’s normally private buildings open to the public, for free. I will probably blog about the buildings I saw yesterday, separately: the Royal Courts of Justice, the Institute of Pathology, the Royal Society and Marlborough House (home of the Commonwealth). All were interesting and open house really is a brilliant initiative.

Yesterday I was with friends, but today I took myself off to Belgrave Square, to the diplomatic residence of the Argentine Ambassador to the United Kingdom. About 20-25 mins walk north from me in Belgravia – home to many of London’s embassies and official residences.

Without further ado:

The 5-storey residence at 49 Belgrave Square

argentine embassy ambassador's residence london

Artwork in one of the ground floor drawing rooms:

argentine embassy ambassador's residence london

Picture featuring Andy Warhol in the lower atrium:

argentine embassy ambassador's residence london belgrave square

The ambassador’s office, strange doll/figure on his desk:

argentine embassy ambassador's residence belgrave square

The office was lovely. Not huge but stunning fireplace and wallpaper. Quite an intimate space:

argentine embassy ambassador's residence belgrave square

This piece of art on the first landing was rather disturbing:

argentine embassy ambassador's residence belgrave square

This photograph, on the other hand, I very much liked:

argentine embassy ambassador's residence belgrave square

Split-level view of the ground and first floors of the residence:

argentine embassy ambassador's residence belgrave square

Last but not least, an ‘interesting’ piece of modern art in the little TV room that is connected to the ambassador’s study:

argentine embassy ambassador's residence belgrave square

7 thoughts on “Don’t cry for me Argentina

Add yours

  1. What a fascinating idea ๐Ÿ™‚

    I love the way you refer to the second photo as “one of” the the drawing rooms on the ground floor. How many drawing rooms (per floor no less) did one need in the days of noblesse oblige? ๐Ÿ˜‰

    It’s interesting to me how unexpected things are in the UK with regards to what one does and does not have to pay for — often the opposite of here. Churches, for instance (St. Paul’s, Westminster Abby) charge for admission. As do the colleges in Oxford and Cambridge. Yet museums do not. I actually have to say I rather prefer that arrangement ๐Ÿ™‚

  2. Justin – there were several on the ground floor. Was a pretty huge house. Yes, it is odd what is free and what is not free here.

    Mancais – hmm I expected it to be quite old fashioned and a bit frumpy but it wasn’t, instead it was all modern photos and installations etc. Quite a nice surprise.

  3. Thanks! I’ve always wondered if you had the equivalent of open monument day in London and it would seem you do. Does it come with a theme? This year’s over here focused on the four elements.

  4. What a great day out! THey do a similar thing in Sydney on a smaller scale. Next year I plan to queue up for Admiralty and Kirribilli Houses (the Governor General and Prime Minister’s respective Sydney residences). You can picnic on the lawns!

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